How the IM Toolbox works

Supporting an iterative, step-by-step process to identify and manage integrity risks

Integrity Management (IM) programmes are unique to each user organization: they respond to the most important risks an organization faces and build on selected tools that can be realistically implemented in alignment with ongoing management and compliance processes. The suggested step-by-step standard methodology for individual organizations is meant to be participatory and flexible.

We recommend professional facilitation and generally work with trained local coaches to support organizations on the long-term throughout implementation.

The IM toolbox can also be used jointly by a group of organizations at basin or sector level.

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INTEGRITY RISKS & TOOLS

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Explore descriptions of typical water organization risks and the mitigation tools available.

GET SUPPORT

Please get in touch for information about how we can support you in launching Integrity Management processes applying the IM toolbox.

1. PREPARING TO USE THE TOOLBOX

During the preparation phase, a baseline is outlined to monitor objectives and the tools are adapted for the specific profile of the implementing organization. Management sets overall objectives, defines priorities, and allocates resources. Stakeholders are then identified to participate in workshops and implementation.

An Integrity Management process tends to work best when it is participatory, includes a wide range of stakeholders from different levels, and has explicit support from high-level management. To be effective, staff members need dedicated time to plan and follow through with IM plans, on the long-term.

 

2. THE IM WORKSHOP: RISK ASSESSMENT & ACTION PLANNING

In a one to three-day participatory workshop, stakeholders:

  • are introduced to the concept of water integrity and how it fits into the work of their organization;
  • jointly assess concrete risks in light of their business model and operations
  • identify and prioritize the most relevant mitigation tools.

The resulting output is a concrete roadmap for implementation of integrity tools, which is realistic in terms of resources and ready for management approval.

3. IMPLEMENTING & MONITORING INTEGRITY TOOLS

After securing resources, designated participants or integrity change agents implement the selected risk mitigation tools in their organization, with the support of an external integrity management coach. This is the most difficult phase of the integrity change process, and can take several months.

Progress is monitored regularly, plans are adjusted, and results are evaluated against the baseline developed during the preparatory phase.

Download detailed documentation on methodology and facilitation here.

INTEGRITY MANAGEMENT AT SECTOR OR BASIN LEVEL

When using the IM toolbox for a group of organizations at basin or sector level, the process is generally led by a sponsor or lead organization, which is most active in the preparation and monitoring phases.

In the preparation phase, the lead organization can map stakeholders, carry out consultations, and develop an additional baseline to identify priority working areas. These steps are needed to adapt the tool to the regulatory framework and local context.

The risk assessments and action planning can be carried out with representatives of the different organizations together or in the individual organizations directly, depending on the scope of the integrity plan. Organizations then implement the actions agreed on with support from integrity coaches that can also be mandated by the lead organization.

The lead organizations monitors progress and possibly benchmarks participating organizations. Results should provide insight on areas to focus on for integrity management in the basin or sector as a whole, as well as on resource and capacity needs.

For support in implementing a sector level IM process or for information on how river basin organizations can use the toolbox for basin-wide change, please contact us.