Tool

Integrity training

Providing conceptual background, an overview of available instruments and tools as well as examples of good practice.

DESCRIPTION

By providing a conceptual background, an overview of available instruments and tools as well as examples of good practice, an integrity training aims to build the capacities, knowledge, and skills on integrity, accountability and anti-corruption necessary to initiate positive change.1 A training should not only be provided to the organisation’s staff and management, but also to external stakeholders (clients, partners, sub-contractors, etc.).2

PURPOSE & LINK TO INTEGRITY

Integrity trainings are an essential guide in the identification of corruption opportunities and in sealing loopholes. Furthermore, they can help change the culture, attitudes and behaviour within organisations that favour unethical behaviour. Staff involvement in awareness raising will help people understand the importance of the challenge of overcoming corrupt practices. Training in integrity provides managers and staff members with the necessary background, skills and knowledge necessary to promote and ensure integrity within the organisation. The sensitisation of external stakeholders further helps to create an enabling business environment.3,4

KEY REQUIREMENTS

HOW TO

  1. Identification of training needs

Before starting the trainings, the training needs of key stakeholders need to be analysed according to targets and tasks set in the road map. Depending on the knowledge and experience of the stakeholders as well as on the targets and tasks set in road map, an integrity training in the water sector could provide knowledge and capacities in the fields of water governance, corruption in the water sector, corruption risks, anti-corruption laws, institutions and instruments, transparency, access to information and accountability, as well as on internal integrity management principles and procedures (e.g. code of conduct, whistle-blower system, etc.).

  1. Identification of trainer

Depending on the training needs, the organization might need the support of an external trainer to realise the trainings. Qualified trainers could be found at:3

  • National anti-corruption bodies, agencies or bureaus: such institutions are created by the government to eradicate corruption in a country. Most of them have programmes in place for the private sector and provide training to companies. The services they offer are relatively cheap or even free of charge. They are also excellent sources of information on national laws and regulations and can explain how best to react when faced with public officials’ demands for bribes.
  • Business associations or chambers of commerce: such institutions usually provide different types of training services for member firms and some may include corruption-related issues in their training portfolio.
  • International organizations and NGOs, such as United Nations Global Compact local networks, Water Integrity Network, Transparency International national chapters and the International Business Leaders Forum: such organisations can provide a regular forum for business leaders and senior executives to exchange best practice on improving corporate governance and reducing corruption. They may also organize meetings and round tables, collate practical tools in local languages and set up collective action projects and programmes for young leaders.
  1. Training of relevant persons (internal / external):

Once the training needs and the person responsible for the trainings have been identified, key stakeholders (including staff, management and external stakeholders) are provided with tools needed to pursue the integrity change process.

The following methods could be used for internal:1

  • plenary brainstorming,
  • group work,
  • presentation of examples and case studies,
  • role-play,
  • panel discussions or
  • testing of tools like the corruption risk assessment tool.

In order to increase the motivation of employees to get involved in the integrity change process, integrity trainings should be combined with personal development targets.

External stakeholders can be sensitised through:2,5,6

  • Informational letters
  • Seminars
  • Awareness training
  • Workshops
  • Information upon contract signature
  1. Recognition

Don’t forget to recognise stakeholders for their contribution to the change process.

Organisations may face resource constraints in developing the content and distribution channels for their communication and training activities. A variety of options may be considered to ease such burdens:7

  • Participate in supply chain trainings: organisations that are part of a supply chain of a larger company may request to participate in trainings or to receive communications. Attention should be paid to ensure that the training content suits the requirements of the organisation´s anti-corruption programme.
  • Use communication and training material that is available free-of-charge.
  • Apply a train-the-trainer approach: A small number of employees can attend an external anti-corruption training, and then convey the information to other internal colleagues.
  • Establish interest groups: organisations can jointly combine their efforts for trainings through collaboration with a local chamber of commerce or trade union. Organisations could also form small groups to share their knowledge and receive training and then to pass on their expertise to other organisations.

KEY GUIDING DOCUMENTS

WGF, 2011, Water Integrity Training Manual, UNDP Water Governance Facility at SIWI (WGF), Water Integrity Network (WIN), Cap-Net & WaterNET, Stockholm, Sweden

UNODC, 2013, An Anti-Corruption Ethics and Compliance Programme for Businesses – A Practical Guide

BUSINESS ANTI-CORRUPTION PORTAL, no year, Anti-Corruption Training, BUSINESS ANTI-CORRUPTION PORTAL, http://www.business-anti-corruption.com/tools/training/, accessed 02.12.2015

FURTHER  READINGS

Litzinger, A., 2012, Integrity management at GIZ, Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH, Germany

US Securities and Exchange Commission, 2005, Field Officers Integrity Program. Evaluation Report 395, Washington DC: US Securities and Exchange Commission

OECD, 2011, Introduction. Proceedings of the Expert Seminar Anti-Corruption Policy and Integrity Training held in Vilnius, Lithuania, 23-25.3.20.11

Ritter, S., 2011, Ensuring integrity in public administration and training managers about their responsibility. The Austrian approach

Sihver, A., 2011, How to develop ethical competence in public service through integrity training and guidelines

Oxford Dictionaries, no year, Sensitize, Oxford Dictionaries, http://oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/sensitize, accessed 02.12.2015

Conradin, K., Kropac, M., and Spuhler, D. (Eds.), Training-of-Trainers, Sanitation and Water Management Toolbox (SSWM Toolbox), seecon international gmbh, Basel, http://www.sswm.info/content/training-trainers-0, accessed 02.12.2015

Dyar, A., no year, How to Improve Workplace Culture, eHow, http://www.ehow.com/how_6512546_improve-workplace-culture.html#ixzz2OegvWOw6, accessed 02.12.2015

Voray, T., 2012, 9 Simple Ideas for Employee Engagement,  Jostle Corporation,  http://www.jostle.me/blog/9-simple-ideas-for-employee-engagement/, accessed 02.12.2015

McGabe, C., 2010, How to Create a Positive Work Culture in an Organisation, retainHR, http://retainhr.blogspot.ch/2010/05/how-to-create-positive-work-culture-in.html, accessed 02.12.2015

Management Study Guide, no year, Work Culture – Meaning, Importance and Characterics of a Healthy Culture, Management Study Guide, http://www.managementstudyguide.com/work-culture.htm, accessed 02.12.2015

Phegan, B., 2003, A Good Company Culture Defined. Company Culture. Introduction. leadership and motivation training

Roltgen, W., 2010, Creating a positive work culture to motivate staff

Ministry of Manpower, 2010, Energising Work Culture, Ministry of Manpower

Mowbray, 2009, A Positive Work Culture – essential for wellbeing and performance at work

BUSINESS ANTI-CORRUPTION PORTAL, no year, Integrity management procedure- Training, BUSINESS ANTI-CORRUPTION PORTAL, www.business-anti-corruption.com/media/61763/fileadmin-user_upload-word-Integrity_System_Training_Procedure.doc, accessed 02.12.2015

UNODC and UNGC, no year, Your certificate, The Fight Against Corruption, United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) and United Nations Global Compact (UNGC), http://thefightagainstcorruption.org/certificate/, accessed 02.12.2015

TI, no year, Doing business without bribery, Transparency International (TI) UK, http://www.doingbusinesswithoutbribery.com/, accessed 02.12.2015

GTZ, 2009,Anti-corruption resource kit, Gesellschaft für Technische Zusammenarbeit (GTZ), http://toolkit2.artmedianet.com/index.html, accessed 03.12.2015

WIN, no year, Tools for Water Integrity, Water Integrity Network (WIN), http://www.waterintegritynetwork.net/tools/, accessed 03.12.2015

Conradin, K., Kropac, M., and Spuhler, D. (Eds.), 2010, The Sustainable Sanitation and Water Management Toolbox, Sanitation and Water Management Toolbox (SSWM Toolbox), seecon international gmbh, Basel , www.sswm.info, accessed 03.12.2015

UNDP Water Governance Facility, no year, Resources library, UNDP Water Governance Facility, www.watergovernance.org/publications, accessed 03.12.2015

FULL REFERENCES

  1. WGF, 2011, Water Integrity Training Manual, UNDP Water Governance Facility at SIWI (WGF), Water Integrity Network (WIN), Cap-Net & WaterNET, Stockholm, Sweden
  2. Litzinger, A., 2012, Integrity management at GIZ, Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH, Germany
  3. UNIDO and UNODC, 2012, Corruption Prevention to Foster Small and Medium-Sized Enterprise Development Vol. II., United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) and United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC)
  4. International Governance Institute, 2007, Public Service Integrity Training Program, International Governance Institute
  5. ICPC, 2013, Summary of Report of the inauguration of the anti-corruption and transparency unit (ACTU) and Gender sensitization workshop for cross river basin development authority, Independent Corrupt Practices and Other Related Offences Commission (ICPC), 4-5th October 2012. http://icpc.gov.ng/icpc-inaugurates-sensitizes-actu-of-cross-river-basin-development-authority-read-full-report/, accessed 29.10.2015
  6. GIABA, 2012, Praia hosts sensitization seminar for francophone and lusophone journalists in ECOWAS, The Intergovernmental Action Group against Money Laundering in West Africa (GIABA), Senegal
  7. UNODC, 2013, An Anti-Corruption Ethics and Compliance Programme for Businesses – A Practical Guide
Last updated 12 April 2019

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