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Water Integrity Global Outlook: Urban Water and Sanitation

INTEGRITY FOR ESSENTIAL SERVICES



By 2050, nearly seven out of ten people in the world will live in urban areas and the number of people living in informal settlements is likely to double. In cities around the world, the water and sanitation situation is already dire: over a third of the urban population lives without adequate sanitation and threats from climate change are increasing.

It’s essential. Cities need clean water and sanitation. And clean water and sanitation need integrity, for city residents, city resilience, and city reputation.


Corruption in water and sanitation has a tremendous impact on the lives and well-being of city residents and on the reputation of cities and water and sanitation sector stakeholders. The issue may seem daunting but evidence from around the world shows that change is possible. And change is essential.



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3 PRIORITIES FOR ACTION







SERVICE IN INFORMAL SETTLEMENTS

DIFFERENT FORMS OF CORRUPTION

URBAN SANITATION

Inadequate service is a reflection of profound social and institutional exclusion, and a deep failure of integrity.

Specfically addressing sextortion and petty corruption is about prioritising and benefiting the most vulnerable.

Despite benefits for health and economy, urban sanitation is the under-regulated poor relation in WASH services.


PRACTICAL CASES FOR URBAN WASH STAKEHOLDERS


Building on the Water Integrity Global Outlook (WIGO) 2016, WIGO 2021 brings together examples of how integrity champions -mayors, regulators, water and sanitation professionals, civil society, funders, the media- are building integrity in cities step by step, to improve water and sanitation services and leave no one behind.


Chapter 6 - Taking action at the city level ( > p125)

Chapter 6 focuses on what municipal and other local governments in charge of cities and towns can do to advance integrity in water and sanitation. Municipal governments have the responsibility for water and sanitation service provision in many countries, directly or through a municipally controlled utility. And they constitute the level of formal government closest to urban dwellers. They are key

actors in fighting corruption, both internally and in their relationship with other actors. This chapter shares useful municipal and local government experiences from around the world, and presents recommendations for action.

Chapter 7 – What can national governments do? ( > p153)

Chapter 8 – What can sector regulators do? ( > p169)

Chapter 9 – What can utilities do? ( > p185)

Chapter 10 – The role of international funders and agencies ( > p196)

Chapter 11 – What can residents, civil society and the media do? ( > p207)




 

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Download the summary in Spanish (pdf, ES)

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Download the summary in French (pdf, FR)

WIN_WIGO2021-Urban_Summary_FR_lores
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Download the summary in Swahili (pdf, SW)

WIN_WIGO2021-Urban_Summary_SW_lores
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TAKE ACTION FOR INTEGRITY


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